February 14, 2019

Cyber war

Are cyber wars at our doorstep?

In recent months the world has made the acquaintance of a
new and perfectly designed computer worm with a specific purpose. Known as
Stuxnet, this dangerous code targets industrial systems by using hitherto
unknown security portals. Stuxnet is the first harbinger of a new era in which
computer worms will be able to wreak damage beyond the abstract world on the
concrete world around us.

Viruses like Stuxnet can, for example, damage the pumps on
water, natural gas, and oil pipelines. They can cause overloads on electrical
power distribution grids and transmission lines, causing them to malfunction,
even explode. They can pave the way to the unanticipated collapse of systems
such as mass transport, health, logistics and banking systems.

Given that the digital hardware and software produced by
humans is not going to be flawless, it is very difficult right now to estimate
where and how far this danger may go in the future. I

East West

An East – West Journalist Hasan Mert Kaya Caner

Her latest book, Begum, acclaimed writer describes journalist Kenize Murad describes life and the struggle of a woman of the eastern world caught in a triangle of love, power and social pressure. Making a splash with her much-talked-about novel, From Palace to Exile, Murad in this latest book takes up the story of the uprising led by Begum Hazret Mahal, who lived in Northern India’s powerful Awad Kingdom in the 19th century. We spoke with Murad about her career in journalism, the world of the east and her most recent work, Begum, in an interview for readers.

You have a long career in journalism that has taken you to some of the world’s most dangerous places. Do you love your work?

Yes, journalism is a job that is very important to me and that I have always loved to do. This profession has been a great adventure for me that 1 could never give up. I could easily have worked in France and French p

Hope Egypt

Hope for Egypt: Dream or Reality?

Don the theme, Dream or Reality? International Book Fair welcoming bibliophiles this month. And Egypt is the guest of honor.

Last year 5 guest of honor was Spain. By the end of the fair, which featured interviews with popular Spanish writers Julio Llamazares, Soledad Puertolas and Angelas Caso, we had learned so much about Spanish life and culture that we wondered all year long who the next guest country would be. Finally the day came and it was announced: Egypt. And we realized how little we know about this country we have been following closely in recent months, especially during the 18-day people’s movement.

When it comes to the literature of this sunny land that is striving to turn dream into reality, a single writer comes to mind: Naguib Mahfouz. Egyptian Ambassador to Turkey Abderahman Salaheldin summed it up perfectly when he said, “The situation is deplorable. Very few Egyptian writers have been transl

Jamana Marmalade

Let’s start the day sweetly

Jamana marmalade, the best way to preserve fruit and vegetables out of season, are an indispensable part of Turkish breakfast. How about adding a dash of color to winter tables with unfamiliar flavors like pistachios, tangerines, black mulberries and lemon peel jams and marmalades?

Making jam is one of the favorite ways to preserve fruits and certain vegetables before they go bad. Jams made from almost any fruit as well as vegetables such as aubergines, courgettes and olives, and from petals of flowers such as rose, is one of the indispensable additions to Turkish breakfasts. It’s easier than you think to make jams and marmalades, mixing in season fruit with sugar in the same pan and cooking it to just the right consistency.

Maria Ekmekgioglu, famous for her jams and marmalades, suggests giving your winter tables a touch of color with unfamiliar flavors like pistachios, tangerines, black mulberries and lemon peel.