Jamana Marmalade

Let’s start the day sweetly

Jamana marmalade, the best way to preserve fruit and vegetables out of season, are an indispensable part of Turkish breakfast. How about adding a dash of color to winter tables with unfamiliar flavors like pistachios, tangerines, black mulberries and lemon peel jams and marmalades?

Making jam is one of the favorite ways to preserve fruits and certain vegetables before they go bad. Jams made from almost any fruit as well as vegetables such as aubergines, courgettes and olives, and from petals of flowers such as rose, is one of the indispensable additions to Turkish breakfasts. It’s easier than you think to make jams and marmalades, mixing in season fruit with sugar in the same pan and cooking it to just the right consistency.

Maria Ekmekgioglu, famous for her jams and marmalades, suggests giving your winter tables a touch of color with unfamiliar flavors like pistachios, tangerines, black mulberries and lemon peel.

Delights in the alleyways of bargain paradise

Making a name for itself as the heart of trade in Istanbul, Tahtakale is also known as t you can find all kinds of goods at budget prices. In this historical neighborhood that t open-air shopping center on Sundays, you can find anything you are looking for on this have compiled a list of addresses for when you need to take a break after a tiring day shopping in this historical neighborhood

Tahtakale, which has come to be known as the heart of trade in Istanbul, is one of the rare neighborhoods where the historical fabric of the streets has been preserved. Of course, this is not its sole quality; it is at the same time an open-air shopping center where you will find anything you can think of, from wedding sweets to nail clippers, tobacco and car accessories.

Enter Tahtakale either from opposite the Hasircilar Gate in the Spice Bazaar or through the back streets leading up from Sirkeci. If we consider the Rustem Pasa Mosque located at the heart of Tahtakale the center, there are three main avenues to cover Hasircilar, Uzungarsi and Marpuggular, as well as the narrow streets that intersect these.

Although wholesalers are predominant in the area, shop owners say, ‘we can’t turn down customers who want to buy retail.’ You can spend as little as 75 kurus here and unless you need anything extra, you can do a lot of shopping by spending as little as 10-15 TL. If you want to avoid the crowds, it’s best to go on a weekday.

You will see Namli on your right, as you enter Hasircilar Avenue from the Spice Bazaar. You are mistaken if you think that you can only find delitassen products here. If you walk into the deli, which offers some 3,850 products, and climb the stairs in the furthest corner, you will reach a restaurant, which is almost like a hidden shelter. They have an extensive buffet.

Make sure to try the Antioch salad made with dried tomatoes, walnuts and zahter (a type thyme) which you will not find anywhere else. Breakfast is also offered all day long. Breakfast courses are 1 TL each, soups for 3 TL, sandwiches for 4.50 TL. The buffet, which offers different dishes every day, starts from 10 TL.

Tel: 0212 51163 93

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